(Don’t) Bite Me! …Rattlesnake Safety for Pets

Rattlesnake safety for pets is an important part of outdoor pet safety, especially when hiking with pets.When spending time outdoors with your pet in the great state of Pennsylvania, hazards like bears and ticks probably come to mind. However, did you know there are some venomous snakes that live in our neck of the woods?

Rattlesnake safety is important for pets and owners alike when venturing into the great outdoors. Barton Heights Veterinary Hospital is here to help our clients understand how to avoid encounters with venomous reptiles in our home state.

Snakes 101

Pennsylvania is home to a few species of venomous snakes, most notably the timber rattlesnake. These creatures reside in more heavily forested regions of the state, and while greatly misunderstood, they are an important part of our ecosystem. Continue…

Outward Hound: Tips for Hiking With Your Dog  

Hiking with your dog is a great way to get in some pet exercise and to spend time with pets.If your idea of a good time is packing up the car and hitting the trails, then weekend hikes in the summer are a must. The only thing that could add to this perfection is bringing your best four-legged friend along for the adventure.

Hiking with your dog is a great option for exercise and bonding, but there are some precautions to keep in mind. Let the loving team at Barton Heights Veterinary Hospital share some important safety tips for hiking with your dog.

Get Geared Up!

Are you and your dog a new hiking duo? No problem. There are some basics to invest in before heading out. We suggest the following gear for safety and comfort: Continue…

Worst Day Ever: How to Find a Missing Pet

Missing PetThere are few moments worse than realizing your pet isn’t where they’re supposed to be. Calling their name over and over, driving up and down the streets of your neighborhood, and knocking on doors doesn’t always yield the bright, happy face you’re longing to see – and it’s agonizing.

If you’ve lived through this heart-wrenching experience, you know that the likelihood of seeing your pet again are frighteningly low. But there are ways to increase the chances of reunion, and we are your go-to source for preventing a missing pet scare.

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posted in:  Pet Loss  |  Pet Safety  |  The Great Outdoors

Pet Poison Prevention in Your Yard

pet poison preventionSpring may seem far off in the distance, but spring will eventually spring! Many of us are wistfully thinking about spring planting and readying our yards for the new season. With more outdoor activity imminent for us and for our pets, we wanted to shed some light on how to protect your pet from potential poisoning in your yard.

It’s amazing (and somewhat scary) how many potential poisons are in yards and gardens. Without further ado, let’s get to the nitty gritty of pet poison prevention in your yard.
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Are Your Holiday Guests Allergic to Pets? How to Prepare Your Home

allergic to petsA significant percentage of adults are considered allergic to pets, but this doesn’t stop a majority of them from liking animals! That may offer little relief to a holiday host or hostess who has to prepare for potential itching, scratching, sneezing, wheezing, and more from holiday visitors. Before you feel defeated, there’s a lot you can do to ensure everyone’s safety and comfort for a happy, satisfying visit.

The Deal With Pet Hair

Pet hair can take over a home, which is why most pet owners are routinely vacuuming, sweeping, and wiping down surfaces. Rarely, though, do we truly see our homes the way visitors might – especially the ones who live without pets.

Dander is primarily to blame for allergies, not loose or shedded pet hair. It’s a protein found in the skin, saliva, or urine of pets, and it can cause mild to major symptoms. Luckily, there are things you can do to help those allergic to pets.

Get Some Suds

You can cut down on your guests’ sniffles by bathing your pet prior to their arrival. We can help you find the right pet-safe shampoo that can reduce associated symptoms in your guests. Weekly bathing has been proven to help people allergic to pets.

We recommend Allergroom, a dry shampoo that optimizes your pet’s skin and coat.

Cleaner Air

If you don’t already have an air filter (or 2 or 3) in your house, consider it an easy, affordable way to clean your house of dander. Keeping one on your guest bedrooms and common areas will help filter out allergens and keep everyone breathing clean air.

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Hit The Road: Tips For Traveling With Pets

White cat sitting in a bag for the animals on the benchMany of us travel during the summer. And, whether you are taking a cross-country drive, a weekend camping trip, or are hopping a plane to some far-off location, you may be planning on bringing your furry companion along for the ride. But traveling with pets does take some special planning and consideration. Here is what you need to know to make traveling with your pet safe, fun, and enjoyable for all.

Things To Consider

Making the decision to bring a pet along on a trip isn’t always easy.  Before you hit the road, you’ll want to consider the following: Continue…

Summer Pet Safety Checklist

west highland terrier
Summer in the Poconos, what could be better? And, then of course there’s antique walks, a vacay with the kiddos, and backyard shindigs. Whether we’re packing up the car for that epic road trip or putting on the BBQ fixings, as pet owners, we may also be pondering whether or not to include our pets. Pet safety, after all, seems to play a part in our planned pet activities.

To help keep your furry family member protected while you enjoy this beautiful season, we’ve compiled the most common seasonal precautions. Continue…

Pets and Cold Weather

                     Cold Weather    

Yes, it is that time of year again when we have to prepare for winter weather.  One of the preparations is for our pets, as the cold can be very dangerous to them.  Here are a few winter weather tips to keep our furry friends safe.

Housing:
It is best to keep pets indoors during the winter months, but if this is not possible, outdoor pets must be provided with shelter. Their home should be elevated off the ground to prevent moisture accumulation and have a door of some kind to keep out winter winds, sleet, and snow. Shelters should be insulated or heated. Water sources may be heated to permit constant access to unfrozen water; thermal units designed specifically for this purpose are readily available. Outdoor pets require extra calories to keep warm. Feed your pet according to its needs when the temperature drops. In severely cold or inclement weather, no pet should be kept outside. Indoor pets should have sleeping quarters in a draft-free, warm area with their bed or mattress elevated slightly off the floor.

Roaming cats:
Roaming cats, as well as house pets and wildlife, may climb onto vehicle engines for warmth during cold weather. Be sure to check under the hood before starting your vehicle and honk the horn to startle any animals seeking shelter inside.

Frostbite and snow removal salt:
Snow and salt should be removed from your pets paws immediately. Frostbitten skin is red or gray and may slough. Apply warm, moist towels to thaw out frostbitten areas slowly until the skin appears flushed. Contact your veterinarian as soon as possible for further care. Snow removal products should be stored out of the reach of pets and small children as their toxicity varies considerably.

 

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posted in:  Pet Safety  |  The Great Outdoors

Summer Weather and Pets

Please remember that our pets are prone to heat related problems. High heat and humidity can cause heat exhaustion, heat stroke or even death in dogs and cats. Here are a few tips to keep your pets out of danger this summer.
1.Never keep your pet in the car during the summer while you go into a store. Temperatures can quickly exceed 100 degrees and can quickly cause heat stroke.
2.If walking your dog bring plenty of water for both of you to drink. It is preferred to walk your dog in the cooler periods such as in the morning or evening.
3.As dogs and cats age that cannot regulate their temperature as well. Keep older dogs and cats cool as much as possible.
4.Make sure any dogs outside have plenty of water to drink and shade to keep cool.
5.Do not walk dogs on blacktop. The heat on black surfaces can burn their pads.
If you think your dog is showing signs of heat exhaustion or stroke (panting excessively, lethargy, vomiting), cool them down immediately with water and call a veterinarian.

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posted in:  Pet Safety  |  The Great Outdoors